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abu hasan
Jul 28, 2022
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Proper use of marquees, drop-down lists, or menus in interface design can have many great effects. Today's good article starts from the four aspects of selecting menus and the number of options/labels/default options/mobile devices, to help you design an elegant way of interaction. It's really good, don't miss it. A good selection menu can: Save screen space and also reduce the possibility of users entering incorrect information (such as showing only valid options) There are many possibilities to make the design even better, such as combining some options, input guidance, and perfect adaptation between platforms It is used in a variety of situations, such as letting the user Number List click directly from the options to fill in the blanks in the form Figure 1: Typical drop-down selection menu We all know that users don't like to enter information directly into forms. The longer the filling process, the harder it is for users to complete it. Typing with your thumb, especially on a device with a small screen, feels horrible, and some elements can make the filling experience even worse — like selecting a menu. 1. Select the menu and the number of options In some interface designs, some selection menus have only 2 options, while others have more than 20 options. Both of these cases are actually the opposite of misuse of the selection menu. Mistake 1: Too many options When a selection menu has more than 15 options, it is very difficult for users to browse and locate the options they want. Long drop-down options lists are horrible. Not only do they take a long time to scroll through, but they can't display all the options at once, which makes the user have to spend a long time to find, which makes the experience poor. Figure 2: Selection list for selected countries A typical example is the "Choose your country" list (Figure 2), which has more than 100 options, and it is impossible for users to have a quick overview of the entire list, and it is difficult to find the desired option in a short time. I myself often can't find where "America" ​​is! Usually "United States" as a more popular option will be placed at the top of the list. However, if some lists are alphabetically sorted, countries like "Afghanistan" will be placed at the front of the list (starting with an A in English), while the corresponding "United States" and "UAE" will be placed at the end of the list together ( English all start with U) - so as a user, I often have to think about the arrangement logic of this selection menu before looking for options. When users know exactly which option they need to find, consider using an input box with auto-fill functionality instead of a selection menu. Taking "select country" as an example, from a programming point of view, you can try to automatically locate the user's location, or automatically give the closest guess option based on the first word entered by the user in real time (Figure 3). Figure 3: Entering "United" automatically matches possible options Quick summary: When there are more than 15 options, instead of using the select menu, consider using input boxes that allow direct user input or autofill.
How to use the interactive mode correctly in the menu
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abu hasan

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